The Rev. Kyle Logan
Matthew 22:34-46
15 mins 15 secs
Views: 73
In this week’s Gospel reading (Matthew 22:34-46), Jesus disrupts our lives. He doesn’t just interrupt our lives, he completely disrupts them. He tells us to love. No, He commands us to love both God and neighbor. Do you find this kind of love nearly impossible? You’re not alone. Truth is, none of us can love this way. There’s only been one Man to do so. The secret to fulfilling this commandment is to recognize Who is at the center of it. It’s not you or me, it’s God. When we rightly recognize God at the center of love itself, we can identity with Christ Who makes this disruptive love possible.
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Matthew 22:15-22
12 mins 2 secs
Views: 73
Every Sunday after the passing of the peace, before the Eucharistic prayers, we offer ourselves, represented by a portion of our time and resources, to the Lord. The liturgy of our nine o’clock service expresses it with the words: All things come of thee O Lord And of thine own have we given thee This idea, that all that we have and all that we are is given to us by the Lord, so that whatever we give to the Lord is given out what He first gave us, is the basis of Christian stewardship. In our Gospel this week, Jesus evades a trap set by his opponents by saying, “Therefore render to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's.” This Sunday, we will consider this answer and how it fits into a life of responding to the mercy and grace of God.
Dan Olson. PHD
Isaiah 25:1-9 & Matthew 22:1-14
12 mins 24 secs
Views: 74
Isaiah talks about the downfall of a great city and a day to come in which the Lord of Hosts will swallow up death and provide a great feast on the holy mountain for all the peoples of the earth. What city is he thinking about?"
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
John 3:1-6
14 mins 45 secs
Views: 75
This week, our readings center on baptism: on being born again by water and spirit; on new hearts and new spirit; on new creations and new ministries; on new access to the presence and peace of God. In baptism we share in the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. We repent of our sins and leave behind the false idols and identities we have collected, and receive instead our new identity as member of Christ, beloved of God and redeemed. Each week we proclaim the creed to refresh our memory of who we are, by proclaiming the God who defines our new identity.
The Rt. Rev. Dr. Todd Hunter
John 15:9-16
21 mins 58 secs
Views: 170
Bishop Todd Hunter's sermon at the institution of the Very Rev. Rob Patterson as the Dean of the NorCal Deanery.
The Rt. Rev. Dr. Todd Hunter
Luke 10:1-2
22 mins 30 secs
Views: 92
Bishop Todd Hunter's sermon at the institution of the Rev. Cindy Stansbury as Rector of St. James. (The twenty seconds has low sound quality then it improves.)
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Matthew 20:1-16
15 mins 17 secs
Views: 81
Since the Fall, there is a sense of futility involved in any work, even work done for the kingdom of God. A house cleaned, gets messy the next day (or sometimes the next hour), software breaks, new bugs are found, children need feeding, customers and patients need help again and again, everyday there is new paperwork to do, and it wears on us. Sometimes the work we do and the results we get don’t seem to line up and we don’t like the feeling that our work is for nothing, not appreciated, or never ending. In our readings this week, we find three accounts of people, Jonah, Paul and the vineyard day workers, wrestling with whether the work they are doing for God matters, is fair, or should continue. Fortunately, there is an answer.
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Matthew 18:21-35
17 mins 40 secs
Views: 84
This week, our readings address the basis of Christian forgiveness. Why do we forgive, when do we forgive, how many times do we forgive? It is easy to think of forgiveness as a side benefit of being a Christian, or as a gift of generosity we may give someone from the goodness of our soul, or as something we withhold until our sense of fairness is appeased. But forgiveness is not a side issue, it is at the core of our life in Christ, in all our relationships, and it flows not from us in our goodness, but from God, and an awareness of our need for it in our own lives. We have mercy because He had mercy and it is to God that we and our brothers and sisters in Christ are accountable, not to our own corrupted and insufficient sense of justice.
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Matthew 18:15-20
10 mins 24 secs
Views: 82
This week’s readings address issues of community, love, reconciliation and accountability in our lives and in our church. Again Jesus speaks of the authority of loosing and binding given to the church He also speaks of the power of having two of us agree on anything and the promise to be present whenever two or three of us gathered in His name. It is a heady responsibility, and one that has been misused in many times and places. In the name of this doctrine, the church has at times slid into being unloving, and destructive. The only way for a community to safely wield this authority without wounding others, is by incarnating the love of the Father, by the power of the Spirit, in the Name of the Son.
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Matthew 16:21-28
16 mins 52 secs
Views: 95
Last Sunday, we got to hear Simon, by the grace of God, answer the question of, “who do you say I am?” and get it right. In response, Jesus gives him a new name, Peter, and a new responsibility to loose and bind. This week, we hear Peter try to use his new authority to correct Jesus, to release him from the path He’s on and tempt Jesus to sidestep the cross. In his less than infinite wisdom, Peter wants Jesus to sidestep the most important event in human history. As the church, we are given authority to bind and release sins, but not to thwart the purpose and will of God. Likewise, as people, we do not have a choice about in what moment in history we are born and live; we only have a choice of how we will live in that moment. I encourage you to read Romans 12 (last week, we read the first half, and this week we’ll read the second half) as a description of how we should live in times like these, both as individuals, and even more so, as the Body of Christ in this place.