The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
John 14:23-29
16 mins 21 secs
Views: 38
A certain woman named Lydia, a worshiper of God, was listening to us; …The Lord opened her heart to listen eagerly to what was said by Paul. When she and her household were baptized, she urged us, saying, "If you have judged me to be faithful to the Lord, come and stay at my home." And she prevailed upon us. Acts 16: 14-15 And in the spirit he carried me away to a great, high mountain and showed me the holy city Jerusalem coming down out of heaven from God. … I saw no temple in the city, for its temple is the Lord God the Almighty and the Lamb. … And the city has no need of sun or moon to shine on it, for the glory of God is its light, and its lamp is the Lamb. Revelations 21:10, 22-23, 22:5 Jesus answered him, "Those who love me will keep my word, and my Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them. John 14:23 Abide with me… stay at my home… make our home with them... Not just a visit, not just an hour once a week, but dwelling, abiding day-in and day-out in the presence of God. Allowing the Holy Spirit to take up residence in the midst of our life, in our hearts and in our minds. This promise is the center of God’s promises to us.Immanuel, God is with us. So how do we live in the presence of God? It is the cry of David’s heart in Psalm 23, and it is a constant struggle for most of us in this extremely distracting, busy place we call home.
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 24:44-53
13 mins 36 secs
Views: 36
In one more week we celebrate Pentecost and the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, but this week we look at Ascension. After the teaching and healing ministry of Jesus; after his suffering, death and burial; after his glorious resurrection; Jesus appeared to his followers, ate and drank with them, opened the scriptures and gave them instructions to prepare them for what was next. And then, almost mid-sentence, he ascended into heaven and was removed from their sight. That unexpected moment is neither the end of the story nor an afterthought. The implications of the Ascension and enthronement of our Lord are far reaching and profound. We are called to embrace and live out God’s mission in this age between Ascension and the second coming of Christ.
Pentecost Sunday is the birthday of the church, the day we celebrate the outpouring of the Holy Spirit on the disciples gathered in Jerusalem after the Ascension of Jesus. The Holy Spirit equips, empowers and directs us, both individually and as the Body of Christ. Our worship and our unity are sustained by the Holy Spirit. The presence of the Holy Spirit is how God dwells in our midst as we gather, proclaim the Word, and sing praises to our God and King. This Pentecost we have the added joy and honor at the 10:30 service, to welcome a new Christian into the family of God. Please come join us!
Dan Olson. PHD
John 16:12-15
14 mins 54 secs
Views: 37
Often we are told that we humans have a grotesquely inflated sense of our importance. We are reminded that our planet is but a tiny speck of dust within a vast universe of stars and galaxies which present us with sizes and distances beyond our ability even to imagine. Is it really believable that the Lord of all the Cosmos should be personally concerned with such microscopic creatures as ourselves, floating as we are within the immense, dark oceans of space? The author of Psalm 8 wonders about this too, and yet he recognizes that our smallness is only half of the story. What does he know that we don't?
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Luke 8:26-39
13 mins 11 secs
Views: 54
Ever have one of those days when everyone around you seems to turn their back on you, ignore you or even worse, act like you don't exist? Well, in our readings for Sunday, God seems to be having one of those days with Israel. God responds to Isaiah's prayer asking for divine deliverance by saying, "I was ready to be sought by those who did not ask for me; I was ready to be found by those who did not seek me. I said, “Here I am, here I am,” to a nation that was not called by my name. I spread out my hands all the day to a rebellious people, who walk in a way that is not good, following their own devices; a people who provoke me to my face continually, sacrificing in gardens and making offerings on bricks; who sit in tombs, and spend the night in secret places; who eat pig's flesh, and broth of tainted meat is in their vessels; who say, “Keep to yourself, do not come near me, for I am too holy for you." In other words, where were you Israel when I was ready and waiting for you? But what comes next is very scary for Israel, because God now lets them know how angry he is with them. " These (things that you did) are a smoke in my nostrils, a fire that burns all the day. Behold, it is written before me: “I will not keep silent, but I will repay; I will indeed repay into their lap both your iniquities and your fathers' iniquities together, says the Lord; because they made offerings on the mountains and insulted me on the hills, I will measure into their lap payment for their former deeds.” So Israel, be prepared because judgment is coming. But, and this is a big but, God also acknowledges that there will be a righteous remnant left that is worth saving. Thus He declares, "As the new wine is found in the cluster, and they say, ‘Do not destroy it, for there is a blessing in it,’ so I will do for my servants' sake, and not destroy them all. I will bring forth offspring from Jacob, and from Judah possessors of my mountains; my chosen shall possess it, and my servants shall dwell there." This will be a long time coming, but in Jesus we are restored as Abraham's offspring, and heirs according the promise. In Galatians, Paul reminds us, "In Christ there is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is no male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus and heirs through hope of His everlasting covenant." Go in peace to love and serve the Lord!
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 9:51-62
14 mins 17 secs
Views: 19
This week, our readings are about following God into his mission --even when it is inconvenient, difficult or at odds with our plans. The Samaritan village doesn’t want to receive Jesus because his face is set for Jerusalem; they don’t like where he is going. Elijah throws his mantle on Elisha while he is plowing and watches to see his reaction to this call. Others want to follow Jesus, but on their own terms, in their own time. But when we choose to follow Christ, we choose to live by the Spirit and also to be guided by the Spirit into the ministry and mission to which God has called us.
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 10:1-11
13 mins 38 secs
Views: 21
In our Gospel this week, Jesus sends out 70 of his followers to go before him into ministry, and they come back rejoicing. In his instructions there is wisdom for our journey as well. For like the 70, we are also sent out into a mission field that is in our front yard, in our daily lives. The hazards, opportunities, challenges and blessings we encounter, deepen and shift our understanding of God and our love for his people. Come join us in worship and fellowship this Sunday!
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Luke 10:25-37
14 mins 22 secs
Views: 15
This Sunday, we will read again the parable of the Good Samaritan. (Luke 10:25-37). Jesus encounters a lawyer on the road who stood up to Him to put Him to the test: "Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” Jesus replies, "What is written in the Law? How do you read it?” The Lawyer answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.” Jesus replies, "You have answered correctly; do this and you will live." But the lawyer, feeling the need to justify himself, asks, “Who is my neighbor?” Aah, can you imagine the look on Jesus' face as he launches into the parable describing this incident on the infamously dangerous road to Jericho? When Jesus finishes telling the story about how the priest and the Levite crossed the road to avoid helping a traveler who had been robbed and beaten half to death, but a Samaritan bound his wounds and paid for his care, He asks, “Which of these three, do you think, proved to be a neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?” He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” And Jesus said to him, “You go, and do likewise." I wonder what the lawyer was thinking as he returned home that night? Perhaps he went home unchanged, muttering “Go and do likewise. Who does He think he is? How can I possibly do that? Everyone knows that the Samaritans are half-breeds and not part of God’s chosen people. The priest and the Levite were just obeying the law. That doesn’t make them bad neighbors. There’s no way that I can do this.” But, what if the lawyer went home totally convicted about his heart attitude? Maybe he got it that God is more than the law; God is love. Perhaps he began to show up at the places where Jesus was teaching to find out more. Possibly he and his family came to know that Jesus is the Son of God and their Savior. Jesus said to him --and to all, "You go, and do likewise." Blessings, Deacon Carole
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 10:38-42:38
18 mins 53 secs
Views: 28
In our readings this week, we hear about Abraham entertaining angels, the Psalmist question of who may abide in [God’s] tent, and Mary and Martha hosting Jesus and his entourage in their home. I can’t help but notice a theme of hospitality, and the different ways Abraham, Sarah, Mary and Martha responded to the opportunity to show hospitality to God in their homes. Besides making me question my own hospitality towards friends, family and neighbors, it also makes me wonder about how I show hospitality to the presence of God in my life. I hope you will come join us this Sunday to worship together and explore this question.
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 11:1-13
17 mins 54 secs
Views: 36
Prayer is communication with God. It may be full of words, emotions, and pleas. It may be quietly sitting in the presence of God. It may be songs of praise, offerings of thanksgiving, or adoration of the nature and character of our loving and holy God. It may be going out to a lonely place before dawn to find enough space to pray alone, or standing in front of a busy hospital praying for a just-met stranger. Or, in the case of Abraham, it may be audacious negotiating with Almighty God for the sake of Lot, just before the destruction of Sodom. In our Gospel, the disciples ask Jesus to teach them to pray, and his answer is the Lord’s Prayer which is at the center of our weekly liturgy. Prayer is time with God; and it clarifies our perspective, heals our soul, and refreshes our spirit. Come join us this week for worship in the midst of chaos and for corporate prayer in the midst of the isolation and noise of life in Silicon Valley.