The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 4:21-30
14 mins 34 secs
Views: 38
This week, we continue on in Luke following Jesus' return to His hometown after a year away traveling and teaching his disciples. (Luke 4:21-30) At first, it seems that the people are pleased to hear from Jesus. Verse 22 tells us, “all spoke well of him and were amazed at the gracious words that came from his lips.” The amazement doesn’t last long though, this is the hometown crowd, and they have grown up with him. Can you just imagine the eyebrows lifting as they turn to each other and say, “Isn’t this Joseph’s son?" Jesus, hearing their reaction, says to them, “Surely you will quote this proverb to me: Physician, heal yourself! Do here in your hometown what we have heard that you did in Capernaum. I tell you the truth; no prophet is accepted in his hometown. I assure you that there were many widows in Israel in Elijah’s time, when the sky was shut for three and half years and there was a severe famine throughout the land. Yet Elijah was not sent to any of them, but to a widow in Zarephath in the region of Sidon. And there were many in Israel with leprosy in the time of Elisha the prophet, yet not one of them was cleansed – only Naaman the Syrian.” Strong words for this Jewish, hometown, audience. These words made the people furious and they tried to take Jesus by force to the top of a hill nearby to throw him off, but He walked right through the crowd and went on his way. His time had not yet come. How do you see Jesus? Who is He to you? How do you react when convicted of your sin?
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 5:1-11
19 mins 9 secs
Views: 33
Some of us become Christians in quiet gradual ways, and many enter into various ministries in response to nudges from the Holy Spirit or reasonable alignment of skills and talents. However, our readings this week are about more dramatic moments of calling. Isaiah is so overwhelmed with an image of God’s glory and an understanding of his purpose, that he offers his life and voice to that mission. That decision shapes and defines the rest of his life; and that prophetic voice shapes the life of Israel and still speaks to us today. Peter is so overwhelmed by Jesus that he falls at his knees and answers Jesus’ call to become a fisher of men. And in Paul’s letter to the Corinthians, he calls them back from their spiritual ambitions to the core of the Gospel, and reminds them that Jesus called each of the disciples, apostles, and even Paul himself to carry on the mission of God. Our calling does not set us apart or above one another, but instead, God calls us uniquely and individually into a shared life and a common mission. How have you experienced God’s call? What ministry is He calling you into?
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 6:17-26
16 mins 45 secs
Views: 29
Some of us become Christians in quiet gradual ways, and many enter into various ministries in response to nudges from the Holy Spirit or reasonable alignment of skills and talents. However, our readings this week are about more dramatic moments of calling. Isaiah is so overwhelmed with an image of God’s glory and an understanding of his purpose, that he offers his life and voice to that mission. That decision shapes and defines the rest of his life; and that prophetic voice shapes the life of Israel and still speaks to us today. Peter is so overwhelmed by Jesus that he falls at his knees and answers Jesus’ call to become a fisher of men. And in Paul’s letter to the Corinthians, he calls them back from their spiritual ambitions to the core of the Gospel, and reminds them that Jesus called each of the disciples, apostles, and even Paul himself to carry on the mission of God. Our calling does not set us apart or above one another, but instead, God calls us uniquely and individually into a shared life and a common mission. How have you experienced God’s call? What ministry is He calling you into?
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Luke 6:27-38
14 mins 40 secs
Views: 59
Last week in the Gospel of Luke, just after choosing the 12 disciples, Jesus began to teach them how to be apostles. In the Gospel for this Sunday we continue on to the second part of this teaching in Luke chapter 6:27-38. Our reading is part of what is called "Luke's sermon on the Plain", which parallels Matthew's Sermon on the Mount. Remember that the Beatitudes go deeper than material poverty and physical hunger, Jesus is telling them --and us-- that we need to hunger and thirst for righteousness and be poor in spirit. The verses following the Beatitudes are a point-by-point negative counterpart to the blessings described. But now Jesus' teaching takes a more personal turn as He describes how they --and we-- must love our enemies and not judge others. Here is a sample of what we will hear on Sunday: "But I say to you who hear, love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you. If you love those who love you, what benefit is that to you? For even sinners love those who love them. Love your enemies, and do good and lend, expecting nothing in return." How can we ever measure up to Jesus' standards? Well the answer is we cannot do it without the Holy Spirit. But thanks be to God! He has given us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ!