The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Mark 10:2-16
19 mins 33 secs
Views: 7
Our readings this week soar. They describe our creation, who we are as stewards of God’s creation, our ranking compared to the angels, and the high Christology of Hebrews which describe Jesus, the most perfect human ever. And then our view comes crashing back down to painful reality as the Pharisees ask Jesus about divorce. What happens when all the beauty and love that God intends for marriage ends in painful places? Actually, not just in marriage, our lives encounter painful places where the mess we make of ourselves impacts the people around us. In our Gospel, Jesus points to God’s original plan and to the consequences and solution to our failure to love.
The Rev. Kyle Logan
Mark 10:17-31
16 mins 40 secs
Views: 8
What is it that causes us to feel insecure? Many of us have so many insecurities, that we inevitably grasp that which makes us feel secure. It’s so common in humanity. So common, in fact, that Jesus has many teachings on security. The passage from Mark 10:17-31 should leave all of us feeling a little uneasy about where we place our trust. The good news, however, is that Jesus offers to us a more firm security than anything we can muster up on our own volition. Over and against all of our insecure motives, Jesus offers us a chance to rest in the security of His grace.
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Mark 10:35-45
11 mins 53 secs
Views: 6
In our Gospel for Sunday, Mark 10:35-45, we read of the request of James and John to Jesus. This passage parallels one from Mark 9:33-37 and both deal with the subject of true greatness and both follow a prediction of Jesus' suffering and death. Clearly these disciples have not been listening during the last weeks of their journey with Jesus. Jesus settles the dispute of who's the greatest by gathering the 12 around him and saying, "If anyone wants to be first, he must be the very last, and the servant of all." In Mark 10, Jesus replies to James and John's request by saying, "You don't know what you are asking. Can you drink the cup I drink or be baptized with baptism I am baptized with?" They reply, "we can." When the rest of the disciples heard this, they were indignant, so Jesus gathered them again to remind them that true greatness is not about who sits on the right or the left saying, "You know that those who are regarded as rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them and their high officials exercise authority over them. Not so with you. Instead, whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first must be slave of all."
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Mark 10:46-52
15 mins 37 secs
Views: 11
There is a simplicity to following Christ that belies the general wisdom on how to better our lives. In our Epistle reading, the author of Hebrews compares the complexity of the temple system of sacrifice: a multitude of priests making a multitude of sacrifices for the people (and themselves); with the efficiency of a singlular, sinless, eternal High Priest, offering Himself one time as a single sacrifice sufficient for the whole world throughout all time. In our Gospel, Bartimaeus, a blind beggar, calls out for mercy, leaps up and runs to Jesus when he calls, is healed and then follows Jesus. Bartimaeus recognizes what he needs in the person of Jesus, and in a few brief moments is transformed and accepted into a new life as a disciple of Christ. The core of Christianity is choosing to follow the way God has provided. To accept the one sufficient sacrifice, accept the offering of love we don’t deserve, forgiveness we can’t earn, healing we can’t achieve, and the new life we can’t find on our own.