The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Mark 1:29-39
11 mins 33 secs
Views: 88
In the breakneck speed of Mark Chapter 1 and in our Epistle reading this week, there is a sense of urgency in the ministries of both Jesus and of Paul. Paul lays aside every strength, advantage and payment for the sake of the Gospel, and Jesus walks away from a potential base camp to travel to other towns. Both of them had a short time to travel and preach the Gospel, and both of them sacrificed stability, comfort and status to accomplish their mission. In our Old Testament reading, and in our Psalm, we have a somewhat different theme; the sheer size and power and infinite understanding of our God together with his care for the small and weak. And in our Gospel there is the contrast of the gathering adoring crowds who come for healing and His retreat to a lonely place to pray. We have a God who could overwhelm us in a moment, but chooses to woo us; who could bring about His kingdom in a moment, but chooses to let us into the mission … and be transformed in the process.
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Mark 9:2-9
11 mins 33 secs
Views: 98
This week’s readings are about the visible glory of God: those moments in which the reality of God’s presence intersects the reality of our material world. During the exodus, God abided by fire and cloud with Israel. Once the temple replaced the tabernacle, the temple was the place where heaven and earth met; where the glory of God could be seen; where God abided with his people. But then the glory departed; the temple was destroyed the people were exiled; and though they returned from Babylon, the glory did not. For a thousand years, Israel was waiting for the return of that glory and presence. And then Emmanuel was born and lived in their midst. The Transfiguration of Jesus, as He is travelling to the cross, is among other things, a confirmation that it now is in the person of Jesus, not in the temple where heaven and earth meet; where God abides with his people; where the glory of God is visible. And in our Epistle, Paul speaks of that same light of glory: “For it is the God who said, 'Let light shine out of darkness'; who has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.” 2 Corinthians 4:6
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Mark 1:9-15
18 mins 46 secs
Views: 85
There were times in church history when people chose to be baptized on their deathbeds, so that they could be sure that all their sins were forgiven, and there would be no time between baptism and heaven. No time to suffer and endure, no time to be tempted and fail, no time to live in the brokenness of our lives wondering how to live in hope. But that is not how Jesus lived and not how we are to live. Jesus was baptized, but did not immediately ascend or transfigure; instead he was driven into the wilderness to be tempted for 40 days to take any path, any shortcut, other than the one laid out before him. He withstood temptation and persevered on his path all the way to the cross and beyond. Living in hope in the face of temptation, suffering, and waiting is a struggle the church has faced for 2000 years, and one we cannot face alone.
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Mark 8:31-38:0
10 mins 40 secs
Views: 90
n our Gospel from Mark 8, Jesus challenges those who would be His to "deny themselves and take up their cross and follow him." We will look at how the hard things or difficulties in our lives bring us closer to Jesus, who suffered and died for us.