Latest sermons by this teacher

The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
John 10:22-30
14 mins 5 secs
Views: 19
esus is the Passover Lamb of a new exodus into a new promised land: eternal life. That is one excellent way to interpret the meaning of this Easter season, and this week’s readings are full of references to the ways God rescues us from dark valleys, death and martyrdom, into life and worship. Our readings are also full of references to shepherds, sheep and lambs. He cares for us in ways that are beyond our imagination, and He cares for us in ways we each see in our lives. Come join us this week to celebrate our Shepherd and our Lamb.
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
John 20:1-18
15 mins 13 secs
Views: 21
Welcome to Holy Week. Tonight at 7:30, we celebrate the evening of the Last Supper and also read about Passover. There will be foot washing for those who are willing, but it is entirely optional. The service starts in celebration, with the palms and purple still up from Palm Sunday, but the service ends in silence as the congregation helps to strip the palms while Altar guild strips the altar. Tomorrow is Good Friday. We have services at noon and 7:30 PM. It is a somber but meaningful marking of the Passion and death that saves us. It is a celebration of the self-sacrificing love of God breaking the power of sin, death and evil. Saturday night at 8 PM, we celebrate Easter Vigil. We light a new Paschal candle from a new fire, processed into the church, we hear more of the whole arc of redemption beginning with creation, we renew our baptismal vows, and then we celebrate with great joy the Resurrection! Sunday morning we celebrate Easter and Resurrection with joyful songs, Eucharist, and readings of the empty tomb. There will also be mimosas at each coffee hour and an egg hunt after the second service. It is my prayer that as much of our community as possible will gather to celebrate as much of this Holy Week as possible. This is our great celebration of the year. These events are the expression and basis of the love and hope that shapes and direct our lives. Please come join us! Maundy Thursday 7:30 PM Good Friday Noon & 7:30 PM Easter Vigil 8 PM Easter Morning 9 & 10:30 AM
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 19:28-40
15 mins 54 secs
Views: 19
This Sunday is Palm Sunday… the Sunday of emotional whiplash. A joyous procession leading to the most incredible miracle of all. We will begin in the courtyard and gather palms to process into the church, praising God and rejoicing in the arrival of the Messiah. But then we will hear of hardship even in the face of obedience to God. We will hear of Christ emptying himself, taking on the form of a servant and humbling himself by being obedient unto death. And finally we will walk through his final hours to the cross and the silence that follows. This is how we enter Holy Week. Palm Sunday is a foretaste of Holy Week. The path to Easter morning passes through the Passion, when our Lord laid down his life for ours. But we live in the light of the resurrection, and we are sustained by that light even in the face of the cross. I hope you will join us this Sunday for Palm Sunday and also join us for the rest of Holy Week .
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 15:11-32
18 mins 59 secs
Views: 19
Last week, our readings pointed to our need to repent. This week our readings are focused on God’s forgiveness. In our Gospel, we hear the story of the prodigal son and the forgiving father. It is a summary of God’s love for us, and the extent to which he will go, to extend grace, to forgive and to rejoice in our return. The purpose of the Incarnation is the redemption and reconciliation of mankind with the Triune God. All this is from God, who reconciled us to himself through Christ, and has given us the ministry of reconciliation; that is, in Christ God was reconciling the world to himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting the message of reconciliation to us. So we are ambassadors for Christ, since God is making his appeal through us; we entreat you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God. For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God. 2 Corinthians 5:18-21
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 13:1-9
14 mins 57 secs
Views: 15
Appropriate to Lent, our readings this week are filled with invitations to come to God, but also warnings and reminders of our need to repent, to watch, to bear fruit… He asked them, "Do you think that because these Galileans suffered in this way they were worse sinners than all other Galileans? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all perish as they did. --Luke 13:2-3 So he said to the gardener, 'See here! For three years I have come looking for fruit on this fig tree, and still I find none. Cut it down! Why should it be wasting the soil?' He replied, 'Sir, let it alone for one more year, until I dig around it and put manure on it. If it bears fruit next year, well and good; but if not, you can cut it down.'" --Luke 13:7-9 So if you think you are standing, watch out that you do not fall. 1 Corinthians 10:12 Seek the LORD while he may be found, call upon him while he is near; --Isaiah 55:1-9 We are given grace, and forgiveness, and invitations to a lavish feast. We have been entrusted with the Word of God, with the revelation of the Father in the life of the Son. But we are also called to repent, to bear fruit, to seek God above all else.
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 4:1-13
14 mins 47 secs
Views: 10
This week is the first week of Lent and our readings are amazing. There are themes of salvation, protection, trust, provision, gratitude, tithing, proclaiming, fasting, and victory over temptation. Our Gospel quotes our Old Testament reading, and our Epistle quotes our Psalm for the week. I encourage you to read through them before Sunday and let them soak into your heart and mind. And may this first week of Lent draw you closer to God; deeper in your understanding, and more aware of your dependence on His mercy and care.
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 9:29-36
14 mins 51 secs
Views: 6
What does the glory of God look like on a human face? When Moses went up to the mountain to speak with God, he came down with a face that was glowing with the reflected glory of God. It gave credence to his claim to be speaking God’s commands, but it was so frightening that he veiled his face. Jesus took three of his disciples up a mountain to pray, and his face changed and his clothes became dazzling white with the glory of God present in Jesus. Peter is so stunned, he makes random suggestions about building booths. The disciples are given a glimpse of the Kingdom of God. And we, who live post-ascension, in the presence of the Holy Spirit, should be transformed by gazing on the glory of the Lord.
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 6:17-26
16 mins 45 secs
Views: 21
Some of us become Christians in quiet gradual ways, and many enter into various ministries in response to nudges from the Holy Spirit or reasonable alignment of skills and talents. However, our readings this week are about more dramatic moments of calling. Isaiah is so overwhelmed with an image of God’s glory and an understanding of his purpose, that he offers his life and voice to that mission. That decision shapes and defines the rest of his life; and that prophetic voice shapes the life of Israel and still speaks to us today. Peter is so overwhelmed by Jesus that he falls at his knees and answers Jesus’ call to become a fisher of men. And in Paul’s letter to the Corinthians, he calls them back from their spiritual ambitions to the core of the Gospel, and reminds them that Jesus called each of the disciples, apostles, and even Paul himself to carry on the mission of God. Our calling does not set us apart or above one another, but instead, God calls us uniquely and individually into a shared life and a common mission. How have you experienced God’s call? What ministry is He calling you into?
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 5:1-11
19 mins 9 secs
Views: 17
Some of us become Christians in quiet gradual ways, and many enter into various ministries in response to nudges from the Holy Spirit or reasonable alignment of skills and talents. However, our readings this week are about more dramatic moments of calling. Isaiah is so overwhelmed with an image of God’s glory and an understanding of his purpose, that he offers his life and voice to that mission. That decision shapes and defines the rest of his life; and that prophetic voice shapes the life of Israel and still speaks to us today. Peter is so overwhelmed by Jesus that he falls at his knees and answers Jesus’ call to become a fisher of men. And in Paul’s letter to the Corinthians, he calls them back from their spiritual ambitions to the core of the Gospel, and reminds them that Jesus called each of the disciples, apostles, and even Paul himself to carry on the mission of God. Our calling does not set us apart or above one another, but instead, God calls us uniquely and individually into a shared life and a common mission. How have you experienced God’s call? What ministry is He calling you into?
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 4:21-30
14 mins 34 secs
Views: 25
This week, we continue on in Luke following Jesus' return to His hometown after a year away traveling and teaching his disciples. (Luke 4:21-30) At first, it seems that the people are pleased to hear from Jesus. Verse 22 tells us, “all spoke well of him and were amazed at the gracious words that came from his lips.” The amazement doesn’t last long though, this is the hometown crowd, and they have grown up with him. Can you just imagine the eyebrows lifting as they turn to each other and say, “Isn’t this Joseph’s son?" Jesus, hearing their reaction, says to them, “Surely you will quote this proverb to me: Physician, heal yourself! Do here in your hometown what we have heard that you did in Capernaum. I tell you the truth; no prophet is accepted in his hometown. I assure you that there were many widows in Israel in Elijah’s time, when the sky was shut for three and half years and there was a severe famine throughout the land. Yet Elijah was not sent to any of them, but to a widow in Zarephath in the region of Sidon. And there were many in Israel with leprosy in the time of Elisha the prophet, yet not one of them was cleansed – only Naaman the Syrian.” Strong words for this Jewish, hometown, audience. These words made the people furious and they tried to take Jesus by force to the top of a hill nearby to throw him off, but He walked right through the crowd and went on his way. His time had not yet come. How do you see Jesus? Who is He to you? How do you react when convicted of your sin?