Latest sermons by this teacher

The Rev. Carole Anderson
Luke 6:27-38
14 mins 40 secs
Views: 29
Last week in the Gospel of Luke, just after choosing the 12 disciples, Jesus began to teach them how to be apostles. In the Gospel for this Sunday we continue on to the second part of this teaching in Luke chapter 6:27-38. Our reading is part of what is called "Luke's sermon on the Plain", which parallels Matthew's Sermon on the Mount. Remember that the Beatitudes go deeper than material poverty and physical hunger, Jesus is telling them --and us-- that we need to hunger and thirst for righteousness and be poor in spirit. The verses following the Beatitudes are a point-by-point negative counterpart to the blessings described. But now Jesus' teaching takes a more personal turn as He describes how they --and we-- must love our enemies and not judge others. Here is a sample of what we will hear on Sunday: "But I say to you who hear, love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you. If you love those who love you, what benefit is that to you? For even sinners love those who love them. Love your enemies, and do good and lend, expecting nothing in return." How can we ever measure up to Jesus' standards? Well the answer is we cannot do it without the Holy Spirit. But thanks be to God! He has given us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ!
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Matthew 2:1-12
14 mins 59 secs
Views: 7
This Sunday, we celebrate the epiphany of our Lord. The visit of the magi begins the revelation of the Lord to the gentiles. God shows himself to the gentiles by the revelation of his son to the Magi. Join us as we take a deeper look at the characters of this reading from Matthew 2:1-12. Joseph, Mary's husband whose faith allowed him to act on the messages sent to him in dreams by God, and protected Mary, and the baby Jesus from harm. The Magi, who believed that the star announced the birth of a great ruler, and who upon finding Jesus, are overjoyed and bow in worship. Finally, Herod the Great, who only wants to destroy any competition to his throne, and tries to trick the Magi into revealing the whereabouts of the Baby Jesus. Isaiah 60:1-3 Arise, shine, for your light has come, and the glory of the Lord has risen upon you. For behold, darkness shall cover the earth, and thick darkness the peoples; but the Lord will arise upon you, and his glory will be seen upon you. And nations shall come to your light, and kings to the brightness of your rising.
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Luke 1:39-45
12 mins 54 secs
Views: 3
At last we come to the final Sunday of Advent. Monday and Tuesday this week we will celebrate the birth of Jesus. Our Gospel in Luke gives us a brief picture of the two cousins who have both experienced the power of the Lord in their lives. Elizabeth, who is expecting her own miracle in a few months, runs to meet her cousin and exclaims, "Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb! And why is this granted to me that the mother of my Lord should come to me? For behold, when the sound of your greeting came to my ears, the baby in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed is she who believed that there would be a fulfillment of what was spoken to her from the Lord." Mary, the Mother of our Lord replies to Elizabeth's greeting with the wonderful words from our canticle, "My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord, my spirit rejoices in god my Savior; for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant." Two ordinary women bound by blood and the greatness of God. They remind us that nothing in impossible with God. But they also remind us that the power of God changes lives. They were simply ordinary women going about their daily lives when God stepped in and changed them forever. That's what God does for each one of us. This Christmas, as we welcome the Christ child into our hearts again, remember this, Emmanuel, God with us, changes us and the whole world forever.
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Luke 21:25-36
10 mins 43 secs
Views: 1
This Sunday, we celebrate the beginning of our Advent season, literally, "the coming of Christ." It is also the church's new year. As we heard from Rev. Cindy last week, Jesus' death on the cross for sins was his coronation ceremony if you will. It was the fulfillment of the Old Testament prophecies concerning Israel and their Messiah. It was also the end of the temple worship as Israel knew it. God would now dwell with His people and they would be his temple. Our readings reflect God's promise for Israel and us beginning in Jeremiah: Behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when I will fulfill the promise I made to the house of Israel and the house of Judah. In those days and at that time I will cause a righteous Branch to spring up for David, and he shall execute justice and righteousness in the land. In those days Judah will be saved, and Jerusalem will dwell securely. And this is the name by which it will be called: ‘The Lord is our righteousness." But as usual, the disciples want to know what the signs will be when all these things come to pass. So Jesus takes them aside and tells them what to expect. The bottom line of the message for them -and us- is this: Stay awake at all times, praying that you may have strength to escape all these things that are going to take place, and to stand before the Son of Man. So as our Advent season begins, let us prepare the way for our King, Jesus, and stay awake or alert because we do not know when He will arrive.
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Mark 10:35-45
11 mins 53 secs
Views: 1
In our Gospel for Sunday, Mark 10:35-45, we read of the request of James and John to Jesus. This passage parallels one from Mark 9:33-37 and both deal with the subject of true greatness and both follow a prediction of Jesus' suffering and death. Clearly these disciples have not been listening during the last weeks of their journey with Jesus. Jesus settles the dispute of who's the greatest by gathering the 12 around him and saying, "If anyone wants to be first, he must be the very last, and the servant of all." In Mark 10, Jesus replies to James and John's request by saying, "You don't know what you are asking. Can you drink the cup I drink or be baptized with baptism I am baptized with?" They reply, "we can." When the rest of the disciples heard this, they were indignant, so Jesus gathered them again to remind them that true greatness is not about who sits on the right or the left saying, "You know that those who are regarded as rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them and their high officials exercise authority over them. Not so with you. Instead, whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first must be slave of all."
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Mark 9:38-50
15 mins 14 secs
Views: 2
In our Gospel for Sunday, (Mark 9:38-50) we continue to follow Jesus and his disciples on their journey. From this Gospel we see that they, the disciples, still have a ways to go in learning all that Jesus needs them to know before he dies. John tells Jesus that they have seen someone casting out demons in His name and that they tried to stop him because he was not one of them. Jesus reassures the disciples that this is okay and then points out what the real problem is: how they deal with the sin in their lives. Remember that our sins offend God and we cannot be neutral about them. James tells us how to confess our sins and be forgiven. In the OT reading, the people have a similar problem with Eldad and Medad, who were prophesying in the camp but had not been in the meeting when the others received the Spirit from God. Moses, replies, "Would that all the Lord's people were prophets, that the Lord would put his Spirit on them!" Clearly Moses is a prophet, because that is what will happen to all believers when Jesus dies and is seated at the right hand of His Father in heaven.
In our readings for Sunday, we have completed our journey through John and now move on to Mark. Our readings all point us to a comparison of the Laws given by God to Moses and how Jesus' coming into the world changed how they are applied. God gave Israel the stone tablets on which the law was written. Jesus writes the law in our hearts and our minds when we come to know Him. Israel had to enter the temple to have access to God. Jesus, His Father, God, and the Holy Spirit come into us, when we accept Him as savior, and make their home in us, making each of us their holy temple. Israel in Jesus' time thought it was okay to obey the letter of the law, keeping them outwardly, while breaking them inwardly. Jesus calls us to a total commitment to His Law. It is not what is outside of us that makes us unclean, it is what flows our from our hearts that matters.
In our gospel for Sunday, John 6:1-21, Jesus feeds the five thousand and walks on water. Two powerful miracles in a row. The 5000 saw a king who would give them food, with no effort on their part. Someone who would heal their sick and give them a better life here on earth, not bad things. They did not realize that Jesus would set them free not only from sin but also from death. Where do we stand on this? How do we see Jesus?
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Mark 1:6-13:0
12 mins 16 secs
Views: 1
Last week, we talked about hope that does not disappoint. This week, we will look at the climates of unbelief that Jesus encountered on his journey to his hometown. How do we create a climate around us that is filled with the glory of God and not unbelief or doubt? Stay tuned for the answer...
This week we are reminded that the Kingdom of God is like … something out of our control. God is the one who reigns in the kingdom of God. We act, but we don’t control outcomes; we may scatter or sow seed, but it is God who makes the plants grow, sometimes into things that are far beyond our expectation, or in places we don’t expect. As Christians, we surrender ourselves to God, and pursue God above all else, even above our own plans, dreams, reputation, and credibility. Come join us this Sunday to see what God is doing in our midst