Latest sermons by this teacher

The Rev. Carole Anderson
Matthew 5:21-37
13 mins 13 secs
Views: 101
This week Jesus goes into greater detail to contrast the external interpretation of the rabbinic tradition with His correct interpretation of the Law. Showing us once again that following Jesus demands a choice on our part, much like the choice we find in the reading from Deuteronomy 30:15-20
The Rev. Carole Anderson
John
13 mins 47 secs
Views: 40
In John we see the working out of this prophecy as it describes John the Baptist's recognition of Jesus as the Messiah and his declaration that he is not the Christ but only the messenger sent ahead to make the way for the Lord who is coming.
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Matthew 11:2-11
11 mins 14 secs
Views: 35
This week we encounter the third week of Advent. The rose candle which we light this week refers to “Guadete” or “Rose Rejoicing” Sunday. This comes from the epistle to the Philippians which speaks of “rejoicing in the Lord always”. Rose Rejoicing Sunday reminds us of how anticipated joy over our Savior’s coming breaks through all our serious Advent preparations. Those of us who have grown up in the Anglican Church know that Advent is a somber season. There were no alleluias and no flowers until Christmas. Some churches even omitted the “Gloria Patri” at the end of the Psalm during Advent. There was to be no celebrating until Christmas. So Rose Rejoicing Sunday gives us an opportunity to rejoice as we await the coming of our King at Christmas. Isaiah speaks of the joy of the redeemed in the coming of their Messiah, or deliverer. Isaiah 35: 1-2 "The wilderness and the dry land shall be glad; the desert shall rejoice and blossom like the crocus; it shall blossom abundantly and rejoice with joy and singing. The glory of Lebanon shall be given to it, the majesty of Carmel and Sharon. They shall see the glory of the Lord, the majesty of our God." This is similar to what happens when someone becomes a believer. The dry desert in which they have existed springs into bloom and they greatly rejoice and shout for joy at what the Lord has done for them. Continuing in Isaiah verse 8 we are told of a highway that will be called the Way of Holiness that only the redeemed will be allowed to access. Then verse 10, “They will enter Zion with singing; everlasting joy will crown their heads. Gladness and joy will overtake them, and sorrow and sighing will flee away.” As we continue in our preparations for Christ's Mass: Have we been obedient in our preparations for our coming King? Will we be among those walking the Way of Holiness? Will we be able to say with John in Rev.19:7, “Let us rejoice and be glad and give him glory! For the wedding of the Lamb has come, and his bride has made herself ready.” Lord, let us be prepared for Your coming. Our desire is to be the most radiant bride who waits for her groom with great joy in her eyes.
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Luke 21:5-19
13 mins 36 secs
Views: 11
Our readings this week take a different turn as Jesus moves away from his controversies with the Jewish Leaders and returns to the teaching of his disciples. Jesus knows that the time is short and his disciples must be prepared for what is ahead. Our reading from the Gospel of Luke (21:5-19) is a portion of what is known as "The Olivet Discourse," because Jesus delivered it on the Mt. of Olives. Jesus' words are a stern warning to the disciples and to us of what lies ahead. “Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom. There will be great earthquakes, and in various places famines and pestilences. And there will be terrors and great signs from heaven. But before all this they will lay their hands on you and persecute you, delivering you up to the synagogues and prisons, and you will be brought before kings and governors for my name's sake. This will be your opportunity to bear witness. Settle it therefore in your minds not to meditate beforehand how to answer, for I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which none of your adversaries will be able to withstand or contradict. You will be delivered up even by parents and brothers and relatives and friends, and some of you they will put to death. You will be hated by all for my name's sake. But not a hair of your head will perish. By your endurance you will gain your lives." The last line is worth repeating, "By your endurance you will gain your lives." The NIV Bible says, "by standing firm you will gain life." If we compare this to Paul's letter (2 Thessalonians 3:6-13), we have a more complete picture of how we are to live as Christians. Paul urges the Thessalonians, "do not grow weary in doing good" So our message for this week seems to be: Do not grow weary in doing good and stand firm- because in doing so we will gain life. A good reminder to us all to, “be strong in the Lord and in His mighty power. Put on the full armor of God so that we can take our stand against the devil’s schemes. For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms.” (Eps. 6:10-12) And all the more as we see the Day approaching. Blessings to you, Deacon Carole
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Luke 18:9-14
14 mins 30 secs
Views: 69
In our readings for this week, our psalm reminds us of the joy and blessedness we have because of our freedom in Christ. Psalm 84 is a prayer of longing for the house of the Lord. It is the cry of the heart of the Levite who presumably wrote this during a period when temple worship was prohibited. Not only was worship banned, but also any access to God's house was forbidden. The author gives voice to his longing for the sweet nearness to God in his temple that he had known in the past. "How lovely is your dwelling place, O Lord Almighty! My soul yearns, even faints for the courts of the Lord; my heart and my flesh cry out for the living God." Have we ever felt this way? It seems so poignant that here is a priest who has no place to worship. Imagine if this should happen to us. How would we react? Well the good news is that our bodies are the Lord's temple, so we really don't need a temple or church to worship God or to come into His presence. Denying us access to the church and corporate worship will not bar God's presence from our lives because, Jesus makes His home in our hearts when we ask Him in. Also, we have the Holy Spirit who teaches us and instructs us in the way that we should go. So, while we would probably miss our place of worship and the fellowship, we would not be without access to God. In Paul's letter to Timothy, we have a wonderful example of a life lived in the fullness of the Holy Spirit. Written while Paul is imprisoned in Rome, we can see from what he writes, that he has complete access to God. Clearly, Paul is someone who is not only in tune with the Holy Spirit; he also does nothing without the Holy Spirit's guidance. Can we say the same thing? Things to ponder
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Luke 15:1-10
15 mins 21 secs
Views: 55
This week, our readings are all about forgiveness and mercy, something that God specializes in. In Exodus 32:7-14, Moses begs God to forgive His people and God relents. In the Psalm 51:1-11, David begs for forgiveness after he has been confronted by Nathan over his sin with Bathsheba. Our gospel reading from Luke chapter 15:1-10, which we could probably name the lost and found chapter, begins with the parable of the lost sheep, goes to the lost coin and ends with the lost or “Prodigal Son.” At the beginning of the chapter, we see Jesus' old nemeses the Pharisees and the teachers of the law are again muttering against him. It seems that Jesus’ penchant for hanging out with sinners and, heaven forbid; eating with them is a problem for them. Jesus responds to the Pharisees in His usual manner with a few stories to get them to see the error of their ways. In the first parable, Jesus appeals to their pocket books. He poses the question, “Suppose one of you has a hundred sheep and looses one of them. Does he not leave the ninety-nine in the open country and go after the lost sheep until he finds it?” Jesus goes on to describe the rejoicing over the found sheep and ends by comparing this joy to the joy in heaven over those who repent. “I tell you that in the same way there will be more rejoicing in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who do not need to repent.” Just in case our Pharisees and teachers of the law didn’t get the point, Jesus continues with another story. Again Jesus starts with a question. “Or suppose a woman has ten silver coins and loses one. Does she not light a lamp, sweep the house and search carefully until she finds it? And when she finds it, she calls her friends and neighbors together and says, rejoice with me; I have found my lost coin.” Do you see the pattern here? Jesus poses a question, then He gives the answer in the form of a parable, finally He explains the parable. Jesus’ comparison here is almost the same as the first one, “In the same way, I tell you, there is rejoicing in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner who repents.” What is our theme so far? Heaven rejoices over the one sinner who repents, more than over all the others who do not need to repent. The good news for us in that God’s love embraces all sinners. Jesus story shows the contrast between the self-centered exclusiveness of the Pharisees, who failed to understand God’s love, and the concern and joy of God at the repentance of sinners. Remember that God loves each one of us as though there were only one of us. "How much more rejoicing is there in heaven over one sinner who repents?
In last week’s gospel, we were reminded to store up our treasures in heaven, because where our treasure is our heart will follow. We were told to always keep watching or be on the look out for the day of the Lord’s return. This week our lessons are all about the judgment that will take place when the Lord does return. Jeremiah compares God's Word to a fire and a hammer that smashes the rock to pieces. Jesus reminds us that he did not come to bring peace, or prosperity, but rather as the reading from Luke 12:49-56 says, " I came to cast fire on the earth, and would that it were already kindled! I have a baptism to be baptized with, and how great is my distress until it is accomplished! Do you think that I have come to give peace on earth? No, I tell you, but rather division. For from now on in one house there will be five divided, three against two and two against three. They will be divided, father against son and son against father, mother against daughter and daughter against mother, mother-in-law against her daughter-in-law and daughter-in-law against mother-in-law.” Clearly the coming of the Lord will not be a fun time for those who have chosen to reject Him. Too late they will realize the error they have made. But these readings also remind us that since we have chosen Him as Lord and Savior, our sin is covered over with His shed blood, and God sees us as His precious children. Because of Jesus we never have to fear the coming of “that Day” again. We will be judged, but only on the basis of what we have done or not done for Jesus. Jesus tells us, “Behold, I am coming soon! My reward is with me, and I will give to everyone according to what he has done. I am the Alpha and the Omega, the First and the Last, the Beginning and the End. Blessed are those who wash their robes, that they may have the right to the tree of life and may go through the gates into the city..... I, Jesus have sent my angel to give you this testimony for the churches. I am the Root and the Offspring of David, and the bright Morning Star.” Rev.22:12-14 … “You also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour.” Luke 12:32, 40
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Luke 10:25-37
14 mins 22 secs
Views: 43
This Sunday, we will read again the parable of the Good Samaritan. (Luke 10:25-37). Jesus encounters a lawyer on the road who stood up to Him to put Him to the test: "Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” Jesus replies, "What is written in the Law? How do you read it?” The Lawyer answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself.” Jesus replies, "You have answered correctly; do this and you will live." But the lawyer, feeling the need to justify himself, asks, “Who is my neighbor?” Aah, can you imagine the look on Jesus' face as he launches into the parable describing this incident on the infamously dangerous road to Jericho? When Jesus finishes telling the story about how the priest and the Levite crossed the road to avoid helping a traveler who had been robbed and beaten half to death, but a Samaritan bound his wounds and paid for his care, He asks, “Which of these three, do you think, proved to be a neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?” He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” And Jesus said to him, “You go, and do likewise." I wonder what the lawyer was thinking as he returned home that night? Perhaps he went home unchanged, muttering “Go and do likewise. Who does He think he is? How can I possibly do that? Everyone knows that the Samaritans are half-breeds and not part of God’s chosen people. The priest and the Levite were just obeying the law. That doesn’t make them bad neighbors. There’s no way that I can do this.” But, what if the lawyer went home totally convicted about his heart attitude? Maybe he got it that God is more than the law; God is love. Perhaps he began to show up at the places where Jesus was teaching to find out more. Possibly he and his family came to know that Jesus is the Son of God and their Savior. Jesus said to him --and to all, "You go, and do likewise." Blessings, Deacon Carole
The Rev. Carole Anderson
Luke 8:26-39
13 mins 11 secs
Views: 114
Ever have one of those days when everyone around you seems to turn their back on you, ignore you or even worse, act like you don't exist? Well, in our readings for Sunday, God seems to be having one of those days with Israel. God responds to Isaiah's prayer asking for divine deliverance by saying, "I was ready to be sought by those who did not ask for me; I was ready to be found by those who did not seek me. I said, “Here I am, here I am,” to a nation that was not called by my name. I spread out my hands all the day to a rebellious people, who walk in a way that is not good, following their own devices; a people who provoke me to my face continually, sacrificing in gardens and making offerings on bricks; who sit in tombs, and spend the night in secret places; who eat pig's flesh, and broth of tainted meat is in their vessels; who say, “Keep to yourself, do not come near me, for I am too holy for you." In other words, where were you Israel when I was ready and waiting for you? But what comes next is very scary for Israel, because God now lets them know how angry he is with them. " These (things that you did) are a smoke in my nostrils, a fire that burns all the day. Behold, it is written before me: “I will not keep silent, but I will repay; I will indeed repay into their lap both your iniquities and your fathers' iniquities together, says the Lord; because they made offerings on the mountains and insulted me on the hills, I will measure into their lap payment for their former deeds.” So Israel, be prepared because judgment is coming. But, and this is a big but, God also acknowledges that there will be a righteous remnant left that is worth saving. Thus He declares, "As the new wine is found in the cluster, and they say, ‘Do not destroy it, for there is a blessing in it,’ so I will do for my servants' sake, and not destroy them all. I will bring forth offspring from Jacob, and from Judah possessors of my mountains; my chosen shall possess it, and my servants shall dwell there." This will be a long time coming, but in Jesus we are restored as Abraham's offspring, and heirs according the promise. In Galatians, Paul reminds us, "In Christ there is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is no male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus and heirs through hope of His everlasting covenant." Go in peace to love and serve the Lord!
The Rev. Carole Anderson
John 13:31-35
12 mins 28 secs
Views: 53
13:31-35), Jesus says to His disciples, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this all men will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Jesus calls all of us to love one another, not just with the love that we can give, but the with the love that only Jesus can give. Think about that for a moment, how many of us are willing to sacrifice our lives for people we don’t even know? In 1st John 3:16 John tells us, “This is how we know what love is: Jesus Christ laid down his life for us. And we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers.” John continues on in vs. 19, “if anyone has material possessions and sees his brother in need but has no pity on him, how can the love of God be in him?” Our actions show others how much we love God. In fact, I think, we cannot truly love one another without God. Even when we have God, it is difficult for us. We are too self-centered most of the time. John admonishes us in vs. 18, “Dear children, let us not love with words or tongue but with actions and in truth. This then is how we know that we belong to the truth, and how we set our hearts at rest in his presence whenever our hearts condemn us. For God is greater than our hearts, and he knows everything.” God knows everything!