The Rev. Kyle Logan
& John 20:1-18
15 mins 29 secs
Views: 106
Death is known as the great equalizer. It is that which all men must find their end. It is also when we will ultimately realize just how powerless we really are. Death is the great opponent that none of us will defeat on our own. All men live and die; only one man died and lives, and his name is Jesus. It is by and through his victory that the power of death no longer constrains us. The Resurrection is not a moment tied to history. Rather, Jesus' Resurrection opens to us a new history that screams victory amidst our failures, forgiveness over our sins, and rightly crowns Jesus with his eternal crown. Come celebrate with us this Sunday as we pop champagne and sing praises to our Savior. Alleluia! -Kyle
The Very Rev. Ed McNeill
John 20:1-18
15 mins 36 secs
Views: 292
Jesus' Resurrection changed everything. Sense emerged from Non Sense.
The Very Rev. Ed McNeill
John 20:1-18
15 mins 30 secs
Views: 140
Easter changes our lives. Easter is a victory celebration. Better than a Stanley Cup or Super Bowl Victory, which while fun is not life changing or of eternal significance. Easter changes the way we live our lives. On Easter Sunday we celebrate Jesus' Victory over Sin and Death! In Jesus we have freedom from the fears that stalk and drives non believers. We do not fear Death and know that we may be freed from the bondage of Sin. Jesus has Risen! We who abide in him share in his victory. Come let us celebrate!
The Very Rev. Ed McNeill
John 20:1-18
23 mins 29 secs
Views: 331
The first sermon of Easter was short and to the point. Jesus Christ is Risen. This amazing good news changes everything. For those with ears to hear, it changes the way we understand the world and ourselves in it. It brings hope to every situation and circumstance. It is fitting that this good news came through an Angel. Mary Magdalene heard it. Why Mary and not Peter and the beloved disciple? This Sunday I'll be preaching on the amazing good news, why it is believable, why it matters, and the example Mary gives us as we seek to live lives of faith. I hope you will join with me in worship on the biggest feast of the year. -Fr. Ed
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
John 20:1-18
15 mins 13 secs
Views: 22
Welcome to Holy Week. Tonight at 7:30, we celebrate the evening of the Last Supper and also read about Passover. There will be foot washing for those who are willing, but it is entirely optional. The service starts in celebration, with the palms and purple still up from Palm Sunday, but the service ends in silence as the congregation helps to strip the palms while Altar guild strips the altar. Tomorrow is Good Friday. We have services at noon and 7:30 PM. It is a somber but meaningful marking of the Passion and death that saves us. It is a celebration of the self-sacrificing love of God breaking the power of sin, death and evil. Saturday night at 8 PM, we celebrate Easter Vigil. We light a new Paschal candle from a new fire, processed into the church, we hear more of the whole arc of redemption beginning with creation, we renew our baptismal vows, and then we celebrate with great joy the Resurrection! Sunday morning we celebrate Easter and Resurrection with joyful songs, Eucharist, and readings of the empty tomb. There will also be mimosas at each coffee hour and an egg hunt after the second service. It is my prayer that as much of our community as possible will gather to celebrate as much of this Holy Week as possible. This is our great celebration of the year. These events are the expression and basis of the love and hope that shapes and direct our lives. Please come join us! Maundy Thursday 7:30 PM Good Friday Noon & 7:30 PM Easter Vigil 8 PM Easter Morning 9 & 10:30 AM
The Resurrection was a pretty dramatic event. But life went on, and generations have come and gone since. So the question is, "So what?" What difference does it make to you today? In fact, is it even that important to believe that it actually happened at all? The truth is that it makes all of the difference in the world.
The Very Rev. Ed McNeill
John 20:19-31
12 mins 7 secs
Views: 294
This Sunday we begin with Jesus' appearance in the Upper Room. Thomas wasn't there and could not believe what he was hearing. Hence his nick name "Doubting Thomas". This Sunday we will reflect on the first words Jesus spoke to the disciples in the Upper Room. They really are amazing and so important for us to hear again.
The Very Rev. Ed McNeill
John 20:19-31
13 mins 37 secs
Views: 77
Jesus appears to his disciples in his risen body. He appears amongst them and speaks to them. What he says is life changing and life giving. This moment was one of the moments where God takes broken people, heals them, and uses them in powerful ways to usher in the Kingdom of God.
The Rev. Carole Anderson
John 20:19-33
14 mins 37 secs
Views: 110
On Pentecost Sunday we move from the "in between time" that Ginny spoke of last week to the fulfillment of the promise made by Jesus to his disciples. We will discuss the difference between the giving of the Holy Spirit in the Old Testament and dramatic arrival of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. We will see that even though we may not be able to see the outcome, God always has another and better plan.
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
John 20:19-31
7 mins 38 secs
Views: 156
This Sunday’s gospel is usually called Doubting Thomas, but there is much more than just an apostle who wants to see for himself that the Lord has risen. Thomas believed because he saw, but John wrote so we could hear, believe, and join the communion of saints. All of our readings are also about unity in the body, forgiveness and reconciliation.