The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 16:1-13
19 mins 53 secs
Views: 38
This week, our readings explore the interactions between the Kingdom of God and the world of finances, right in the midst of our personal lives. Paul advises Timothy on how the church should view pagan and unworthy leaders. Jesus tells the story of the dishonest steward which is a difficult parable to understand and apply. Are we to be praised when we are dishonest? Is buying influence justified if it is in the name of eternity? Surely not. Our Old Testament reading in Amos, Jesus’s conclusion, and the Pharisees response all give clues to the meaning of this parable. Jesus says “No slave can serve two masters; for a slave will either hate the one and love the other, or be devoted to one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and wealth.” Sometimes we don’t notice the ways we negotiate and compromise with our surrounding culture, and sometimes we react out of bitterness and fear towards the world around us, but our readings point to another way to live: in an attitude of love and generosity towards all those God has created, while never forgetting whose servant we are.
The Rev. Cindy Stansbury
Luke 16:19-31
18 mins 10 secs
Views: 53
Our readings this week continue from last week’s readings. In our Gospel, Jesus is still responding to the Pharisees’ dismay at how he eats and drinks with sinners, with the parable of the Rich man and Lazarus. Amos addresses those who think they are comfortably out of reach of the drama and judgement that will befall the rest of God’s people. Paul, writing to Timothy for the sake of a people in the midst of a complex hostile culture, teaches on godliness with contentment and the dangers of the love of money. All of this is relevant to our lives in a place where the cost of living is so high, and the prevailing expectations of our culture don’t leave space for God, family, or contentment.